Thank you, Star and Trey, for bringing up some insightful and thought-provoking issues on this point. I can relate to both sides, and to some of the experiences you describe. As someone who has, since an accident 8 years ago, lived with chronic pain and an invisible sitting (and carrying) disability, the challenges and frustrations never end. Air travel, in particular, makes me anxious; flight attendants don’t get it when I say I can’t sit, offering me a wheelchair; security staff give me that ubiquitous eye-roll whenever I ask them to lift my regular sized carry-on onto the security scan belt - as if to say: wow, ain’t she a princess. Wherever I happen to be traveling, by subway, bus or boat, I always look at the collection of logograms that depict visibly challenged passengers entitled to priority seating (in Thailand, there are also visibly ‘honored’ passengers = monks); I’m not represented in any of them, nor are any of the millions of citizens of the world whose lives are a day-to-day challenge of unseen, hidden pain and disability. Surely, it’s time for some serious advocacy & action for / by Invisability clients, patients, consumers, guides, carers and friends? Perhaps we can find a way — an Invisability card being one option — for us to obtain recognition as ‘honored’ and respected passengers and citizens too.

Author. Artist. Walking retreat founder. Researcher/Investigator. Culture-devourer. Dog-hugger. Cow-whisperer. Labyrinth-maker.

Author. Artist. Walking retreat founder. Researcher/Investigator. Culture-devourer. Dog-hugger. Cow-whisperer. Labyrinth-maker.